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Stores being too hot or cold among the nation’s biggest shopping gripes

Stores being too hot or cold, the returns counter located on a different floor and overpowering smells are among the nation’s biggest shopping gripes.

A study of 2,000 Brits found the aspects of modern retail spending which irk us the most, including the layout of a shop changing, broken contactless card machines and even no Wi-Fi in store.

For shopping online, 45 per cent named slow web pages to be their biggest bugbear, alongside products looking different when they arrive and having to wait for refunds.

But while clothes shopping in-store irritates 31 per cent of the nation, just one in 10 feel the same way when purchasing online.

An annoyed 57 per cent even said they have walked out of a shop without buying what they went in for, because they were so fed up.

Mark Howley, UK CEO of Starcom, which commissioned the research as part of it’s ‘Future Tensions in Retail’ report said: “This research defines a cultural shift and insights into consumers for brands around the future of retail.

“Shopping should be an enjoyable experience with interactive areas to enhance this and we predict the way people shop will develop greatly over the next few years, as it already has done up until now.

“Some brands are already delivering this kind of enhanced experience for consumers.

“Topshop recently launched an immersive experience in its flagship store encouraging customers to touch displays, take pictures and relax on the soft furnishings.

“And Samsung’s new experiential store in Kings Cross allows customer to experience its products, attend masterclasses and provide the consumer with key information by the tech experts.”

The study also found one in five have had a disagreement with a member of staff due to being annoyed when shopping, and this has led to three in 10 deciding to shop online instead.

A sixth admitted they feel stressed and frustrated when clothes shopping specifically, while one in 10 find themselves ‘bored’.

But more than a third view shopping as an ‘experience’ and aspects which make a great store were found to be attractive interior, plants and even ‘Instagram-able’ spaces.

It also emerged that a quarter of shoppers would like to see apps which allow you to scan items to avoid having to wait at the checkout, while one in 10 would even like to to have AI-powered shop assistants.

And with the average shopper starting to feel ‘impatient after queuing for 10 minutes, it’s no surprise 44 per cent would like to see waiting times improved in the future.

Another two in five want prices of products lowered.

More than a third would like to see packaging to be more environmentally friendly with one in five taking into consideration whether items are produced ethically when buying them.

A quarter of those polled, via OnePoll, said while they want to buy new things, they also want to help the planet and be sustainable.

The study also found that almost a third believe shops are ‘important’ to their local community and three in 10 think the traditional high street filled with independent stores will return sometime in the future.

To encourage this, nearly a third believe encouraging online retailers to put events on in store or host pop-ups will help it thrive.

But if they could only shop one way in the future, 26 per cent would opt for online while just 24 per cent would opt to go in-store.

This is due to a sixth liking the idea of not having to leave the house, more than a third enjoy having online discounts and 37 per cent believing they are able to brands they don’t have in stores nearby.

On the other hand, two thirds like to actually see a product before purchasing, three in five want to be able to hand pick items and one in five enjoy talking to staff.

Howley added: “These stats only reinforce that brands need to start offering an even more thrilling and enjoyable experience to the shopper, aside from just a good product.

“Brands need to think about the customer retail journey, what can you offer them to get them in store that you can’t get online?

“You need to think about what you can offer in terms of exclusivity, building hype around product drops, offering the Instagram photo-opp, from a fancy wall to some type of entertainment, or even an immersive sensory experience.”

FSB asserts retail ‘no deal’ concerns

Small businesses are in urgent need of more government support to overcome a worrying lack of preparedness for a no-deal Brexit.

That according to new research from the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB). In the first UK-wide small business assessment of no-deal preparedness ahead of 31 October, FSB’s research shows that among those small firms that believe a no-deal scenario will negatively impact them (39%), only one in five (21%) have planned or prepared for anticipated issues. Nearly two thirds (63%) don’t think they are able to plan.

Preparations for a no-deal Brexit have come at a high price, with the average cost for these businesses that have prepared, coming in at around £2,000.

That average cost rises to £3,000 for smaller businesses that export and import. Just under one third (31%) of prepared small businesses have stockpiled ahead of 31 October while 34 per cent report temporarily or permanently reduced profitability.

Just under half (46%) of these firms, along with those that plan to prepare for no-deal over the next few weeks, think that the volatility in Sterling has negatively impacted their business. Almost half (46%) of small businesses, that believe they will be negatively impacted by a no-deal scenario, would welcome some form of financial support.

In response to the findings, FSB National Chairman Mike Cherry renewed calls for the provision of financial assistance such as vouchers worth up to £3,000 to assist with preparing for a potential no-deal scenario, including supporting small firms in reaching new global markets.

Given the number of small businesses unable to take specific actions to prepare, he also called for wide-reaching measures in an early budget to boost small business cash flow.

These include a temporary reduction in VAT, an uprating of the employment allowance, an expansion of HMRC time to pay arrangements and extending the two year ‘retailers’ business rates discount of 33 per cent, to a wider range of smaller businesses.

Cherry said: “As the risk of a chaotic no-deal Brexit on 31 October remains alive and kicking, it is worrying that many small firms have either not prepared or are finding that they can’t prepare.

“Ongoing uncertainty is to blame for preparations hitting the skids with the picture still not clear as to how the UK will leave the EU on 31 October. Until we get clarity, small firms must prepare for the cliff edge where possible, and make preparations for a no-deal Brexit.

“Preparing for this outcome is coming at a high price though with small firms being hit by an unstable pound and having to shell out money on a potential outcome that has been highly disruptive, remains uncertain and is unwanted. Government must use what little time is left before 31 October to provide small firms with the support they need to navigate the uncharted and turbulent waters of a no-deal Brexit.

“Raising awareness is important, but not enough. The Government must also turn to meaningful financial support. This is desperately needed and would certainly provide a much needed shot in the arm for those firms that have already spent money preparing. For those firms that can’t prepare, we need broader support including cutting VAT and National Insurance, uprating the £3,000 employment allowance and extending the two year ‘retailers’ business rates discount of 33 per cent, to a wider range of smaller businesses.”

Retail brands reaping rewards of personalisation

Sephora has claimed top spot in Sailthru’s 3rd annual Retail Personalization Index for the third year in a row, with Nordstrom earning second place.

The overall trend in the Index is for high scoring brands showing signs of true multi-channel personalization that is orchestrated to suit the customer.

The Retail Personalization Index is derived from a survey of 1,500 consumers; it compares feedback about cross-channel customer experiences against data such as net promoter score and repeat purchase rate.

Sailthru says it’s clear that consumers report higher satisfaction and are more likely to report purchasing again from brands with engaging, personalized experiences that make shopping easy and enjoyable across all channels.

Jason Grunberg, VP of Marketing at Sailthru, said: “Customers are highly engaged on mobile and email, not just on site and in store. The brands that performed best in the Retail Personalization Index do two things right. They deliver deep personalization on individual channels. And they deliver experiences between channels that keep customers coming back. Today, the customer controls their shopping experience, and that’s why their feedback drives this research.”

Large big box brands received high customer scores for likelihood to buy, but so did other brands such as Nike, Adidas, and Etsy. The data shows customers embrace a variety of online, bricks and mortar, big and small brands, as long as the shopping experience is rewarding.

Across the brands evaluated, some clear trends in capabilities separated the best performers from the rest.

When comparing the top 25 to those that did not make the top 100 Sailthru found:

  • On site, 88% of the top 25 brands had personalized recommendations vs. only 21% of brands that did not rank in the index
  • On email, 96% of the top 25 brands provided personalized product recommendations compared to 23% of unranked brands.
  • On mobile, 84% of the top 25 brands use push notifications vs. 10% of brands not in the top 100

Many leading scorers such as Sephora, The Home Depot, and Urban Outfitters performed particularly well on mobile and email channels, where Amazon scored poorly. Many online brands such as Thrive Market and Boxed also showed multichannel sophistication that beat Amazon. In particular, retailers with good mobile personalization climbed the rankings, which reflects changing consumer habits, with global m-commerce transactions set to overtake e-commerce transactions this year.

Other key findings:

  • Sephora, the beauty retailer, secured the top rank for the third year in a row
  • Nordstrom jumped to second place with an improvement in mobile score
  • Walmart placed 25, with a strong website score, but average scores on other channels despite recent technology investments
  • Amazon placed 57, with a strong website score, but lower scores on other channels

“The retailers that stood out this year and those that truly understand their customers’ behaviors and preferences and invest in personalization that reflects that understanding,” said Cassie Young, Chief Customer Officer at CM Group. “Consumers have made the move to mobile, and the retailers that have made that transition alongside them successfully lead the pack.”

To explore the Retail Personalization Index Top 100 go to https://www.sailthru.com/personalization-index.

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Tesco brand strong, but UK retailers behind global rivals

The value growth of the UK’s top retail brands is falling behind the leading global retail brands, according to the 2019 BrandZ Top 75 Most Valuable UK Brands ranking announced today by WPP and Kantar.

While the UK retailers in the Top 75 grew their combined value by 4% over the last year, their performance is significantly lower than that of the retail brands in the BrandZ Global Top 100, which grew by 25%.

It also represents a slowdown compared with the UK retailers’ 2018 value growth of 11%.  

The retail sector dominates the UK Top 75 again this year, with 14 retail brands making the ranking: Tesco, Next, Asda, Sainsbury’s, Marks & Spencer, Morrisons, Ocado, Boots, Co-op, Very, Waitrose, John Lewis, WHSmith and littlewoods.com. Online-only players Ocado and Very grew the most – by 35% and 21% respectively.

Without them, the combined value of the UK’s top retail brands would have increased by just 2%.

Of the retailers in the Global Top 100, Amazon was the biggest hitter, increasing its value 52% to US$315.5 billion. 

Highlights: The 2019 BrandZ Top 75 Most Valuable UK Brands shows:

  • Tesco is the most valuable UK retail brand (no.7) worth $9.2 billion, followed by Next (no.22), Asda (no.23), Sainsbury’s (no.24) and Marks & Spencer (no.27).
  • Ocado (no.34) grew its value fourth fastest of all the brands in the UK Top 75, rising 35% to $2.0bn.
  • The total value of the brands in the UK Top 75 (in all sectors) fell by 3% over the last year.
  • Outside retail, the other brands in 2019’s top 5 fastest risers are Deliveroo, (+54%; no.50; $1.4bn), Costa Coffee (+48%; no.47; $1.5bn), BrewDog (+40%; no.57; $1.2bn) and Innocent (+35%; no.51; $1.3bn).
  • Among three newcomers to the Top 75 this year, WHSmith enters at no.68. Aston Martin (no.69) and Halifax (no.70) are the other two.

The BrandZ Top 10 most valuable UK retail brands 2019

Rank 2019BrandBrand value 2019 (US$bn)Brand value changeRank 2018
7Tesco$9.2+1%7
22Next$2.8+4%25
23Asda$2.8+8%28
24Sainsbury’s$2.8+4%26
27Marks & Spencer$2.5-18%22
33Morrisons$2.1+6%36
34Ocado$2.0+35%49
40Boots$1.7-7%39
45Co-Op$1.5+2%48
52Very$1.3+21%58

Note: BrandZ is the only brand valuation ranking that combines validated financial data with consumers’ opinions to calculate the value a brand contributes to the business that owns it.

UK retailers are facing a raft of pressures, many driven by the changing needs of consumers who have high expectations when it comes to convenience, range, speed of delivery and competitive pricing. As a consequence, a record number (net 2,481) of well-known names disappeared from the UK’s top 500 high streets in 2018, including Maplin, Toys R Us and Poundworld.

Other retailers, in particular fashion brands, are moving from high street sites to new shopping areas such as train stations, airports and malls that attract high footfall and charge lower rents and rates.  

Some of the UK’s retail brands live off their fame, but are no longer distinctive or relevant to today’s consumer, according to Henry Heywood, Head of Brand at Kantar:

“The mantra here is that you cannot live off fame alone. Salience has kept brands buoyant, but without meaningful difference this is not sustainable; salience will drain away, along with value. To avoid losing more ground, retailers must reinvigorate themselves – invest in long-term brand building, by communicating to a less engaged, less loyal and more demanding consumer about why they are still relevant.”

BrandZ’s analysis also reveals the success of Irish brand Primark – not in the UK ranking –which has flourished on the high street, driven by its ability to create meaningful difference.  Built around value-for-money fashion, the brand has developed a strong emotional connection with young shoppers online via celebrity influencers and other paid partnerships.

This year’s BrandZ UK Top 75 highlights that online players Ocado and Very are the main drivers of growth. Recognised by shoppers as innovative, dynamic and responsive, they have built strong emotional connections with consumers through their customer service, range and pricing – and, ultimately, are good at telling their story. 

Heywood added: “While the death of the physical store is exaggerated, traditional retailers are having to reinvent themselves for a new generation of shoppers, connecting digital platforms and online experiences with the physical offline experience. But now with the advent of online to offline, such as the launch of the Amazon Clicks & Mortar initiative in Manchester, there will be additional pressure on an already beleaguered high street.”

Image by StockSnap from Pixabay

Shopping Mall

Retail business rates to rise by £170m in 2020 – Study

The UK’s High Street retailers could be facing a £170m increase in business rates next year.

That’s according to analysis of available data by real estate specialist Altus Group, which says the total business rates rise in 2020 is likely to be in the region of £660m, based on an expected adjustment +2.1% in line with September inflation.

If correct, it’s yet more financial pressure on the High Street, something that the industry is already lobbying the government to address.

Last month fifty major retailer demanded the Government takes action to fix the ‘broken business rates system’. In a letter to the new Chancellor, Sajid Javid, retailers called on the Government to put business rates at heart of the promised new economic package.

The letter, coordinated by the British Retail Consortium, was signed by major retailers including the CEOs of supermarkets, food-to-go, fashion, homeware, and department store retailers.

The letter asked for four fixes that would address many of the challenges posed by business rates:

  • A freeze in the business rates multiplier;
  • Fixing transitional relief, which currently forces many retailers to pay more than they should;
  • Introducing an ‘Improvement Relief’ for ratepayers;
  • Ensuring that the Valuation Office Agency is fully resourced to do its job.

Altus Group’s Head of UK business Rates, Robert Hayton, reiterated the point, telling PA: “With major retail and hospitality businesses reducing their estates and headcount often citing high level of rates as a contributory factor, I urge the Chancellor to take the bold and ambitious step of being the first Chancellor to freeze the multiplier since the national business rates system was introduced in 1990.”

URLs ‘most important credibility factor’ when it comes to eCommerce

A ​study​ by ​Panda Security​ surveyed 1,000 Americans, asking them what the most important credibility factor is when making a purchase online.

The survey found that:

●  29.3% of respondents cited a ​secure URL (https)​ as the most important factor

●  18% of respondents cited a ​testimonials and reviews​ as the most important factor

●  8.6% of respondents cited ​familiar methods of payment ​as the most important factor

●  7.3 % of respondents cited ​trust badges​ as the most important factor

●  4.9% of respondents cited ​available contact info​ as the most important factor

●  4.4 % of respondents cited ​website design​ as the most important factor

Panda says that while an ecommerce site should have all of these credibility factors to keep it secure, it’s also important to note which ones consumer’s value. The top two factors were a secure URL (https) and testimonials and reviews, so be sure you have both on your site.

For more information on these credibility factors, read the full study ​here​.

ANALYSIS: Why was H1 2019 online growth the lowest recorded?

A boost in June wasn’t enough to save online retail in the first half of 2019, with records showing that sales slumped to their lowest ever growth rate of just +5.4% Year-on-Year (YOY), according to the latest IMRG Capgemini eRetail Sales Index.

The Index tracks the online sales performance of over 200 retailers with a combined annual spend of £28bnComparatively, the same time period in 2018 saw results of +16.9% YoY, with consumer spending buoyed by events like the Royal wedding, World Cup and the Spring heatwave.

This slowdown in growth was also broadly reflected across the sectors, with all but three recording reduced but still positive increases. Health & beauty (+13.0%), home & garden (+9.3%), and clothing (+7.3%) saw the strongest growth, with clothing in particular having a substantially better Q2 (+11.2% YoY growth) than Q1 (+2.6% YoY), due to the hot weather and retailers starting their summer sales early. 

Looked at individually, one of the largest YoY declines in growth was seen in garden (-34.4%), although this reflected a fall from a particularly high growth rate in H1 last year thanks to the standout weather from April onwards.

Elsewhere, the sectors which fared worst were electricals (-22.7%), gifts (-22.8%) and lingerie (-8.9%), all of which have experienced a continuous decline in sales over the past six months.

Bhavesh Unadkat, Principal Consultant in Retail Customer Engagement at Capgemini, said: “The year started with a lot of gloom in the retail sector following the drop off in performance in H2 2018 and consumer confidence also fell to all-time lows. During the first half, consumer confidence settled in negative territory, on average 5.5points below 2018 and growth was lowest recorded 5.4%, a third of last year.

“In addition to this, consumers are cutting back on non-essential according to a Barclaycard survey, and sectors such as electricals are taking a hit online (-23%).

“If this year continues to mirror performance of last year, we can hope for a stronger second half.  However, with Brexit happening just before peak period and still uncertainty around what it will bring, we cannot know whether the index will recover or growth under 10% will be the new norm, at least for this year.  Caution and volatility within the market remain for the foreseeable.”

Andy Mulcahy, Strategy and Insight Director at IMRG, said: “In this country we have a tendency to regard online retail and physical retail (high streets) as being completely separate; an idea that has been feed over the past few years by the consistent growth in online even as the high street struggled. What we are now seeing is that they are not separate at all, but in fact deeply interconnected – hence growth in the first half of 2019 was the lowest yet recorded.

“With so much media coverage of well-known retailers announcing profit warnings and store closures, customer confidence in shopping with them is low. This forces them into heavy discounting to drive sales and their competitors get dragged into it too. It has now become so widespread that shoppers are used to the wide availability of discounts and many retailers – whether online-only or with a store portfolio – seem a bit stuck in it even before we reach the Black Friday peak.

“That said, from an online sales growth perspective it is the multichannel retailers (+5.2% for Jan-Jun 2019) who are currently experiencing lower growth than the online-only retailers (+7.4%). It may be that the old perception of getting better value online still persists, and that shoppers associate high street retailers with the highest chance of falling into administration, so they are having to work even harder than their online-only competitors to build sales.”

Revealed: The High Street shops Brits want to see

The perfect high street is home to a Post Office, green grocer, butcher – and boozer.

Britain’s traditional main shopping thorough-fares are facing stiff competition from the boom in online shopping and the emergence of huge out-of-town malls.

But the majority of us still have a perception of what the High Street should be able to provide, with a decent bakery, a good DIY shop, and independent clothes outlet all making the list.

An energy provider, restaurant and barber were also hailed as a must, along with a supermarket and shoe shop.

However, just eight per cent of the 2,000 adults polled currently do the bulk of their shopping locally, preferring to drive or use public transport to top up at larger shops and supermarkets.

And while eight in 10 do make the effort to use their local High Street, many think it lacks the outlets they require to get everything they need from one trip.

Three quarters said they were worried about the decline of their high street, and 32 per cent said the retail outlets which are left, such as betting shops and beauticians, aren’t
what is needed.

Researchers also delved into the reasons why the local high street is being neglected by so many – and found one in three avoid it amid a worry goods are generally ‘more expensive’.

Bill Bullen, CEO of smart energy provider Utilita, which carried out the research to celebrate the opening of its second hub in Southampton, said: “As this study shows, there is a real desire for the high street to remain a fruitful and central part of any town or city; Brits like the idea of having one place where they can access all their products and services.

“However, not enough people are shopping on the high street and this means many businesses are finding it unsustainable and are therefore closing down.

“If people want to see their local shopping area do well, they’ll need to invest a little more time and money in the businesses currently there.”

The OnePoll.com study also found other shops adults are keen to see locally include record shops, vegan shops, and jewellers.

Furthermore the average adult visits their local shopping area twice a week, but spends just £23 in total in the process.

One in three aren’t impressed with the shops, while expensive parking puts off three in 10 shoppers.

Limited choice is a factor for four in 10 and busy Brits often find it more convenient to shop online.

However, given the opportunity, shoppers would prefer to buy something from a ‘real person’ than via the internet, and four in five love to converse with shop workers when purchasing something in-store.

Bullen added: “Our high streets are important economic hubs, the small and micro businesses – thousands of which we supply – on them forming the backbone of the UK economy.

“But they are more than this; they are the beating heart of communities across the nation.

“It’s why we want to support high streets by launching a national roll-out of Utilita energy hubs following a successful trial venture in Gosport, Hants, in 2018.

“Our Southampton hub launched just days ago, and similar stores will open in Edinburgh, Derby and Bradford – to name but a few – over the months to come.

“This will have long-term benefit for us and the communities we serve, in addition to giving customers the face-to-face service they crave as Utilita brings energy back to the nation’s high streets – in every sense.”

SHOPS BRITS WANT ON THE HIGH STREET
1. Greengrocers
2. Independent clothes shops
3. Baker
4. Butchers
5. Handyman / DIY
6. Record shop
7. Shoe shop
8. Chain clothes shops
9. Post Office
10. Luxury clothes shops
11. Newsagents
12. Gluten free / Vegan shops
13. Restaurants
14. Pubs
15. Energy / utility providers
16. Supermarket
17. Jewellers
18. Coffee shops
19. Barbers
20. Charity shops

Summer festivals to drive £1.2bn spend at UK retail

Festival goers will spend over £1.2bn this summer in the UK on food, clothes and merchandise, with adults averaging £67 per day and retailers reaping rewards from ‘pop up’ experimentation.

That’s according to a study commissioned by Barclaycard to mark its partnership with Live Nation and AEG at eight music festivals across the UK.

The credit card giant polled 2,000 adults and found that 36 percent plan to attend at least one festival in 2019.

Food is the biggest daily spend, averaging at £46, with Thai (16 percent) and fish curry (15 percent) preferred to the traditional burger and beer. 

An adventurous six percent will try insects onsite, while eight in every 10 festival goers will purchase something unique which can’t be bought elsewhere. 

Four in 10 even prefer to shop at live entertainment events than online, or on the high street – with a third considering these event better places to uncover new trends.

And just under half of those polled prefer the unusual product offering laid out on stalls, and 41 per cent feel more connected to the products they buy at a live event.

Making memories is also increasingly important to Brits when deciding how to spend their money, with many keen to take away something extra from their festival experience.

Four in ten (41 per cent) also said they feel more connected to the products they buy at a live event, over those made on the high street or online.

200 merchants were also polled by Barclaycard, with results indicating that festivals are seen as fertile ground to trial new products and ideas, with half testing products which they’ll then later roll out online or in store.

With the festival industry currently worth over £2.46bn and 36 per cent of Brits planning to attend a festival this summer, Barclaycard says live events pose an increasingly lucrative opportunity for new and established brands.

Daniel Mathieson, head of sponsorship at Barclaycard, said: “Pop-up commerce is thriving across the UK festival scene, as brands compete to provide the ultimate fan experience.

”With more ways to engage audiences alongside demand for a deeper connection to the products they try and buy, festivals are becoming a fertile ground for all kinds of businesses to grow.

“In recent years we’ve also seen festivals start to offer dedicated event spaces to brands while providing activations on-site has also become increasingly popular.

”As festival spending looks set to rise, my advice to UK businesses is to explore the sales and marketing opportunities the UK live entertainment scene presents, or risk losing out to more savvy competitors.”

Image by Free-Photos from Pixabay

Online retail ‘must try harder’ to avoid basic mistakes

Online retailers could be making more in revenues if they applied simple measures, such as appropriate product imagery.

That’s according to research carried out on 1,213 UK adults by agency MarketingSignals, which found a staggering 61 percent of those polled were put off purchasing from a website by insufficient or poor product imagery, followed by 57 percent that found product descriptions inadequate.

The survey also found that more than half (52 percent) of these businesses are failing potential customers with their lack of customer service, while 47 percent have overly intrusive discount pop ups on the home page, which can potentially detract users from making a purchase.

43 percent of those polled were put off by websites that has an over complicated checkout process, while 41 percent would be deterred by an e-commerce business which has little or no social media presence.

A third (34 percent) of those questioned said that a lack of delivery options would deter them from from making an online purchase, whilst a website that wasn’t optimised for mobile devices would put off 27 percent of respondents.

16 percent said they’d be put off from making a purchase if they couldn’t see company information or an ‘about us’ page. Completing the top ten reasons which deter users from making a purchase was customers who prefer to use alternative payment methods, with over one in ten (11 percent) saying that they’d seek to make their purchase elsewhere if a website did not accept the PayPal or Apple Pay.

Gareth Hoyle, managing director at marketingsignals.com, said: “It’s clear from the research that many potential customers are being put off from making a purchase from websites they are not familiar with, which makes it so much more important for e-commerce businesses to make the checkout process as simple as possible in order for them to complete their transaction smoothly.

“In this social media age, it’s perhaps unsurprising that 41 percent of Brits would be put off from making a purchase from a website that is unfamiliar to them and doesn’t have a visible social media presence.

“Internet savvy consumers are always keen to spot a bargain, though can be put off by over complicated or seemingly untrustworthy websites when attempting to make a purchase, instead opting to buy from a site they already know and trust. So what this research demonstrates is that it’s clear that there are simple steps e-commerce businesses can take in order to improve conversion rates from first time visitors to their site.”

The top ten reasons that deter customers from making an e-commerce purchase:

  1. Insufficient or poor quality product imagery – 61 percent
  2. Inadequate product descriptions – 57 percent
  3. Lack of customer service – 52 percent
  4. Distracting/Intrusive pop ups – 47 percent
  5. Over complicated check-out process – 43 percent
  6. Little or no social media presence – 41 percent
  7. Lack of delivery options – 34 percent
  8. Desktop-only site design – 27 percent
  9. Insufficient or lack of company information – 16 percent
  10. Not accepting alternative payment methods including PayPal and Apple Pay – 11 percent

Image by StockSnapfrom Pixabay